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Posts Tagged ‘success’


Well, in that case I guess I had better throw in something about plants as a counterpoint to my latest entries that seem to have been more about animals than flowers.

Day lily - hemerocallis fulva

This day lily is a classic in Danish gardens. (I think it’s a hemerocallis fulva, but I might be mistaken.) This particular day lily comes from The Flâneur Husband’s grandmother’s garden, but it was also in my mother’s garden, in my grandmother’s garden and in my great-grandmother’s garden. In other words, this is a classic country garden perennial, though these days it seems to have fallen from grace and is largely out-done by newer, more showy day lilies.

(The photo above was accidentally taken with the flash on, which is why the colours seem so vibrant; in the real world it’s a somewhat duller shade of brown-tinted orange.)

Any way, it’s one of those plants that I am not 100% in love with, but it wouldn’t be a proper garden without it, so it has been given a prominent position in The Ambitious Border! And it is pretty much the sort of plant you put in the ground and then never worry about again; it’s hardy as you like, and it spreads very moderately, so it will fill out nicely but won’t overrun its neighbours. Oh, and it blooms at the perfect time for a holiday home garden; in mid summer when we will be spending the most time up here!

I do want some of the modern, more showy day lilies, though… Real lilies are so-so when it comes to hardiness around here, and since I already have heaps of dahlias that need to be lifted every autumn and over-wintered in a frost-free place, I think a fully hardy alternative to lilies is a wonderful thing!

Another wonderful thing is happening in the Sunny Border; my dahlias have started blooming! A few are from tubers that I’ve bought, but most of them I grew from seed in the windows back in the apartment in Copenhagen.

Dahlia giant hybrid

They were mixed seeds, so there’s no specific name for any of them. I bought 4-5 different seed packets – giant hybrids mixed, giant cactus hybrids mixed and so on – and if they are even remotely pretty I intend to lift the tubers in late autumn and over-winter them. So far it looks promising

The slugs love them, of course, but I knew they would. Fortunately they tend to go more for the foliage than the flower buds, so though the plants themselves might look a bit sad, the flowers are mainly all right. (The damage on the flower above looks too subtle to be done by the slugs; they tend to do more “whole-sale” damage…)

Dahlia Giant Cactus Hybrid

It’s still early days for the Sunny Border; there are just a handful of dahlia blooms, but there are plenty more buds waiting to burst, so I definitely think it’s safe to say that growing dahlias from seed has been a success!

And it really was dead-easy; I had a germination rate of close to 100%, and all the seedlings survived being transplanted into the bed. (Some have been more mangled by slugs, winds and rain than others, but that’s hardly the plants’ fault.) Even if one just grew them as an annual and didn’t worry about lifting the tubers in autumn, this is still a great set of plants for very little money. Also, I grew them! From seed! To use the terminology of today’s youth: This is AWESOME!

I really post too many close-ups. I’m sure you all know what a dahlia or a day lily looks like, whereas you might not have any way of knowing what The Ambitious Border or the Sunny Border looks like. I shall do my best to get some larger shots soon so you can see what the overall look of the garden is.

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Forget water beetles, forget dragonflies, forget all that, and instead look closely at the photo below:

Toad in the hole

Do you see it? Just to the right of the two rocks…

Toad in the hole - closer look

We have a toad! All right, so he was here all along (The Flâneur Husband narrowly missed him while he was mowing the lawn the day before yesterday) but that same afternoon he went for a swim! In The Puddles!!! And he stayed there for hours on end, sitting on the sloping rock and seemingly enjoying himself!

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-Or something like that…

The lupin seedlings have now started breaking through the soil, and obviously I’m terribly excited about this!

image

-Apart from anything, this means that when my husband comes to Denmark on Sunday there will be an obvious defence for why there are trays of compost in the windows in the dining room: “But LOOK! There are things GROWING!”

I do, though, have one problem. I THINK these seeds are Lupinus mutabilis, an annual scented lupin, but then they might be mixed in with perennial lupins, since I did a rather poor job at labelling my seed envelopes. Must do better this year!

But of course I love all lupins so it doesn’t matter too much; it just makes it slightly more tricky to plan where these should be planted. (Will they be there just for one year or will they be perennial? Will they be white/pale blue or will they be dark purple?)

You may notice that this picture doesn’t show one of those plastic boxes I bough for seed-sowing because miniature greenhouses were so expensive… Well, it turned out that my local supermarket suddenly decided to have small 18-unit “miniature greenhouses” for DKK 30 a piece (just around 5 USD), so I purchased two of those and will do a comparison to see what works the best. The quality is decidedly so-so, but it might be good enough to last a few years and the size means that I should be able to transport them up to the garden without problems.

IEK!!! This is exciting!!! Can I please skip work and just stay at home and watch my seedlings? (Okay, I can’t. I get it. I’ll hit the shower and get going, then.)

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