Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Roses’ Category


Right, so last time I went up to the garden my luggage contained three rhododendrons… This time the luggage was lighter, but the number of plants greater!

In case you can’t see it – which is understandable – this is a bag full of roses. Three red L.D. Braithwaite that will go in the Sunny Border, 5 New Dawn that will be planted 2 by each of the trees that carry the hammock in summer and one to be planted wherever I might think of it.

And to top it off there are also 5 Rhapsody in Blue, just because I like the outlandish blueish-purple hue of these roses.

So 13 roses to be planted, and only the site for the L.D. Braithwaites is prepared. That should keep me busy this Saturday and Sunday, I reckon!

Of course the New Dawn roses will be planted in the lawn, so I will do yet more cutting away turf at the foot of the trees that will act as trellises for them. I suspect this is a bit of a suicide mission, but never mind. Less grass, more flowers!

The Rhapsody in Blue is the joker in this game; I have no idea where to put them, but I guess I could stick them in the Ambitious Border in the area where I sowed annuals last year. Anyway, I’ll work that out once the Braithwaites and New Dawns are in the ground.

Read Full Post »


Within the European Union (EU) there are no border checks for plants and plant products travelling between member states and, it is possible, to import and export plants freely with very few exceptions.

Having thus proven the legality of my actions, should anybody wish to question it, here is the luggage that I checked in when returning from visiting the Flâneur Husband in Aberdeen over Easter, a 4′ by 2′ sportsbag:

Of course, the bag held very little in terms of “normal” luggage.

On top you see one rhododendron, and in the black bin liner underneath are another two. Yup, I brought three 3-foot rhododendrons from Scotland to Denmark…

My husband really likes these plants that he had in pots on his large deck by his Aberdeen apartment, so since he’s moving back to Denmark – and the garden and, of course, myself – on June 1st he wanted to bring these plants back with him, and I had the pleasure of schlepping them first via plane to Copenhagen and then by bus, metro, train and bus up to the garden by the summer house. (I make it sound worse than it is, of course. It’s a trolley bag, so essentially I just rolled it around a bit.)

I got back from Scotland on the evening of Easter Sunday and went up to the garden on the morning of Easter Monday, but because it basically rained the whole day yesterday it seemed foolhardy to attempt to prepare proper planting holes for them and plant them, so instead I heeled them in in one of the raised vegetable beds where they await the weekend. There will be more pictures ones they are installed in their permanent location.

The rhododendrons won’t be the only planting project of the coming weekend, though; the Flâneur Husband’s birthday present from my parents (ordered by me online) finally arrived today. Three L.D. Brathwaite bare-root roses, and I’m pleased to say they look like prime quality. Well-developed roots, lots of tiny shoots and generally a healthy-looking group of plants. The postal service managed to send them but not deliver them – and fail to notify me that they were held at the local post office for a week before being returned to the sender – but then the nursery packed up three fresh roses and sent those to me instead, so in spite of the delay I really don’t think I could have had a better service from that nursery.

www.rosenposten.dk

Yeah, I wanted to give them a mention, just because they’ve been so helpful and seem to have delivered great quality. I know most of you won’t be ordering from a Danish nursery, but still. They deserve a positive mentioning! (And if you ever find yourself in Denmark and need to order a rose online, you now know where to go.)

Read Full Post »


So this weekend the Sunny Border was completed!

Flâneur Gardener digging away merrily

The last fiddly bit towards the covered terrace was finally cleared of turf, and a few perennials were rescued from in-between the grass. This was mainly my project, while my husband busied himself around the garden, cutting back the poplars towards one neighbour and the hazels towards another and lopping off a branch of the red-leaved cherry plum tree.

Then we installed that nasty-looking plastic barrier towards the lawn, and it turned out as invisible as I’d hoped for, so that was good, and finally I could start loosening the soil so we could add some compost (the birthday present my husband got from his mother).

Flâneur Husband shovelling compost

We also did a bit of tidying up, moving piles of branches out back and generally trying to make the place a bit more presentable, though it’s still too early in the season to mow the lawn. (And it desperately needs a haircut!)

The result

It’s just a clean slate right now, or almost, but I think it will end up looking great. I put back some perennial sweet peas and a geranium that had been struggling in the tall grass up against the wall, and then there’s a line of stepping stones before the larger part of the border where the roses and larger perennials will go. I put in a few clumps of iris from my mother’s garden, because I think they will look great in front of the roses what will eventually go in beside them, and at the far end I moved some Japanese anemones (also from my mother’s garden).

I do need to be careful not to cram it full of everything that will fit in there, because I suspect some plants may want to grow a little over the summer, but so far it definitely has great potential.

My husband keeps saying he doesn’t want it to look too twee, so his knee-jerk reaction when I talk about planning the planting and coordinating colours is that he’d prefer something much more random, but obviously I’m not letting him have his way here. The colours will be mainly blues, purples and reds, ranging from light to dark hues, and with a bit of luck I’ll be able to have flowers in the border from May/June to the first frost.

I’m really rather excited about this!

Next weekend the plan will be to start tackling the vegetable beds. They’re terribly overgrown, and one of the beds has been used as a depository for dried perennial stalks that need to be cut up and go in the compost bin. And perhaps put in an effort to do some weeding in the Ambitious Border…

Read Full Post »


It is Spring. All is pruned back.
We’re cutting down the shrubberies and the budgets.
Gone is the gluttony of yore.
We exercise until we look like skeletons.
I age five years
each time I dig into my wallet
but when the spring sun shines
I become young!

(Det er forår. Alting klippes ned.
Der beskæres i buskadser og budgetter.
Slut med fordums fede ødselhed.
Vi begynder at træne til skeletter.
Jeg blir fem år ældre
ved hvert indgreb i min pung,
men når forårssolen skinner,
blir jeg ung!)

The above is the first verse of a song written by the Danish poet Benny Andersen. As a child I never quite understood it, because surely Spring should be about growth, and cutting back would be in autumn!

But as we all know it isn’t. There are last years spent perennials, of course, and the roses and the fruit trees. And later in the spring the forsythia and other spring-flowering shrubs.

The night frost has returned, and it looks like it will continue on and off for at least a fortnight, so my spring header on the blog mainly celebrates the calendar spring; it’s very difficult to see in the garden, except for the snowdrops and the winter aconites, but then they’re only harbingers of Spring, not Spring itself!

I also took a series of “before” shots of my pruning targets for this weekend, and I will upload them together with “after” shots in a later blog entry. Please do not mock me; I may be inexperienced at pruning, but any pruning is better than no pruning, right?

Read Full Post »


Because I took a day and a half off at the end of last week to visit my parents I had to do some (LOADS) work on Sunday, and I decided to just do it from home, rather than go into the office. And this is what my work space looked like; forsythia in bloom and dogwood just on the cusp of showing its leaves…

There is a bunch of forsythia and dogwood in each of the windows in the sitting and dining room, and though some fortsythia branches are blooming more than others (I really need to get those pruning secateurs out this year!) they make a wonderful display of spring. Even if the branches on the dining table might be slightly over-sized… It looks like I’ve stuck a small tree in the middle of the table!

My mother wants to buy my husband a rose for his birthday (and he knows this), and I’m considering L.D. Braithwaite. Does anybody have any experience with this Austin rose? It looks stunning, and it seems easy to take care of, but of course sellers might be deceptive…

Also, my Mum and I have hatched a plan to attempt growing dahlias from seed. I will order the seeds, split up the packages and send her half – along with copies of the seed packets – and then we shall see what happens. We both want bold, exuberant flowers for little money, so we will be ordering some seed mixes for large dahlias. I do realise this will mean I have to have a windowsill or two of compost in the apartment, but if that’s what it takes…

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts