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Posts Tagged ‘flowers’


On Sunday April 28th at 8 o’clock in the evening I got the lawn (okay, most of it) mowed, so I did manage to get it done within April!

Now, I agree that it does look a bit tidier now than with the 10″ grass jungle, but it also looks so much less interesting, because all the small flowers that had come out all over the lawn have now been cut down.

Here are a few examples:

I also suspect that the mowed lawn will be much less interesting to the wood pigeons and the pheasant and all the other birds that have taken to strutting their stuff on the lawn while foraging, not to mention the smaller animals like insects and the like.

*sigh*

A lawn is a desert painted green, but there’s no helping it; it must be mown, though I probably will never get around to doing it on a fortnightly basis. Still, little by little I’m carving out sections of lawn and turning them into flower beds that will allow for more diversity both of plant and animal life. And I promise: I will NEVER weed the lawn!  Just look at the above beauties; I can’t imagine why some people are less than thrilled to have such flowers growing in-between the grass!

 

(I only got around to mowing perhaps half of the lawn; the area in front of the covered terrace and the area from the drive to the front door. The rest will be done the coming weekend when I have a three-day weekend up in the summer house with my mother-in-law in tow. I actually look forward to having some company up there that isn’t classified as “wildlife”. Also, when my mother-in-law gets bored, she starts cleaning or cooking… Either is welcome!)

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A while ago, A Woman Keen On Sensible Footwear (a.k.a. Wellywoman) commented on one of my recent posts that she wasn’t aware that forsythias would root in water.

Well, the proof’s in the rooting, as they say:

Granted, it does take some time, which is why this lovely vase is grimed over with lime scale, but it’s a perfectly easy way to propagate this bush, either to create more of it or to create new undergrowth if it is beginning to get too top-heavy and tumble over.

I generally find that most branches will root in water, given enough time, and the trick with the forsythia is just to let it bloom away, drop its flowers and then wait for the leaves to appear. Once you have leaves on your branches, the roots will be there in very little time, with no need for rooting hormones, special treatment or anything.

In the vase above – as in all my vases of forsythia – I have mixed the forsythia branches with red dogwood. The red stems create a nice counterpoint to the brash yellow flowers, and once the flowers are gone the dogwood – in this case a rather pleasantly variegated cultivar (ooh, look at me throwing proper gardening words about; “variegated”, “cultivar”!!!) – will start showing leaves sooner than the forsythia. And of course the dogwood have as lovely flowers, even if less attention-seeking, as the forsythia. And the dogwood, too, roots before long.

Considering that I’m trying to replace an ugly wooden fence with a hedgerow of living plants, I think this sort of propagation is about as easy a solution as you can get! I could, of course, also just start pinning down overhanging branches, leaving them for a year and then cutting them loose and transplant them, but this is so much quicker and also adds to my connection to the garden. I have it right here with me in the apartment!

The pot at the back of the picture above is the sedum flowers I brought in as a bouquet last autumn and decided to keep, since they started rooting.

So far it seems that my success with cuttings is a one-all; I have had no success with rose cuttings, in spite of taking numerous the year before last, but I’ve had great success with flowers that were just picked to be pretty in the apartment and then decided they wanted to live!

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